Main bearings, rod bearings, gaskets

earlbrown

runs with scissors
When looking at the front of the block, check out the left galley hole. Just below the surface you'll see where the oil goes to that galley from the pump. If you put a plug in too deep, you'll block off the oil flow and starve the engine.

From the factory those plugs were press fit like a plain ole freeze plug and someone along the lines tapped it for a tapered pipe plug. MAKE SURE they didn't run the tap down so far that it causes a restriction. To make things worse, it's located after the oil pressure tap, so if it is a restriction it'll make your oil gauge read higher while at the same time smoking bearings.


I probably wouldn't blast that cover. It wouldn't take much abrasive media to ruin your day after the engines built.
 

obrut

Member
I'll check the plugs and see how the measure out compared to the hole in the block.

I already blasted the front cover, are you saying I can't get it clean enough to use again? I cleaned it twice after blasting it. I was going to start your modifications tonight to the front cover and clean it three more times to make sure all the metal and sand are out of the front cover.
 

earlbrown

runs with scissors
It's hard to say from my side of the interwebs.... but are you willing to risk the engine, turbo and oil cooler over it?

Keep in mind, that any media you might miss has a job to do.


If it were me and I felt good about it, I'd probably still run it through the dishwasher a bunch of times.
 

obrut

Member
Its very clean right now. I plan on doing the mods and clean up on the front cover and then, rinse and clean in parts cleaner, then brake cleaner then pressure washer twice and once or twice in the dishwasher.... just to be sure.

I did order head gaskets, pan, valve cover and manifold gaskets today from kirban. I had my local auto parts order a brass freeze plug kit for $10 I might as well change those too.

What is the measurement for the HV oil pump gears? I found it once before but can't find it now. I want to make sure I have standard oil pump not an HV.
 

obrut

Member
I finally assembled the short block rotating assembly, torqued the mains with ARP studs to 100 ft/lbs and the rods with stock bolts to 40 ft/lbs. I used GM E.O.S. for assembly and on the bolts. I installed the cam bearings, I noticed its kind of hard to mess up the alignment of the oil holes, the galleys in the block are pretty big. I have not installed the galley plugs, I need to figure out if the front screw plugs are the correct size. The back sides of the plugs are both tapered to a point, not flat like most pipe plugs I've seen. Anyone have a picture of the TA plugs? Should I just flatted out the back side for more clearance? Thanks for all the help.
 

obrut

Member
Earl I've been working on my front cover. I followed the steps you have outlined in your write up. I cleaned up the flashing in the water passages and around the fuel pump opening. I did not drill the oval hole down by the gears because my pump has been milled for the kenne bell plate. I can sand the KB plate smooth like you do with the pump but what about inside the cover where the top of the gears ride. Mine is a little scored in that area, can it be cleaned up or leave it alone?
 

obrut

Member
The oil filter adapter is clean and smooth, the KB plate is now sanded flat, figure eights, until the score marks were gone. Can I do the same for the gears? what about the front cover, how do I clean up where the gears are?
 

earlbrown

runs with scissors
Earl I've been working on my front cover. I followed the steps you have outlined in your write up. I cleaned up the flashing in the water passages and around the fuel pump opening. I did not drill the oval hole down by the gears because my pump has been milled for the kenne bell plate. I can sand the KB plate smooth like you do with the pump but what about inside the cover where the top of the gears ride. Mine is a little scored in that area, can it be cleaned up or leave it alone?


Drill the hole and put that plate on Ebay. All it does is double your chances for an oil leak and mismatch your high pressure port with two extra steps. (unless it's a thrust plate, not a KB booster plate. In that case throw it n the scrap metal bucket)
 

obrut

Member
So I can remove the plate even thought the oil filter adapter has been milled to use the KB plate?

What about cleaning up the score marks in the fornt cover?
 

obrut

Member
Here are some pics of the cover, adapter and plate

20140927_073006.jpg 20140927_072922.jpg 20140927_072941.jpg 20140927_072952.jpg
 

ek02

Well-Known Member
Attached is a photo of the TA Performance plugs. The passenger side is the thin one, and they must be flush or below the cam thrust area. I have been using the KB oil booster plates on V6's and 455's since 1978 with no problems or leaks. I install 1/4-20 helicoils in all the cover bolt holes, and use longer than stock allen head bolts with tight fitting metric lock washers. Your oil filter adapter has been modified with a ground out area for the bypass hole in the plate, so you need to use gaskets with the correct holes cut in them. If you do away with the plate, I believe you will need a new oil filter adapter without the ground out area. Earl's trick with the drilled hole works fine also, just a matter of my personal preference for the plate. You need to put the gears in the housing and measure the clearance between the gears and the housing sides with a feeler gauge. Factory specs are .002-.006.


photo (6).JPG
 
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obrut

Member
Attached is a photo of the TA Performance plugs. The passenger side is the thin one, and they must be flush or below the cam thrust area. I have been using the KB oil booster plates on V6's and 455's since 1978 with no problems or leaks. I install 1/4-20 helicoils in all the cover bolt holes, and use longer than stock allen head bolts with tight fitting metric lock washers. Your oil filter adapter has been modified with a ground out area for the bypass hole in the plate, so you need to use gaskets with the correct holes cut in them. If you do away with the plate, I believe you will need a new oil filter adapter without the ground out area. Earl's trick with the drilled hole works fine also, just a matter of my personal preference for the plate. You need to put the gears in the housing and measure the clearance between the gears and the housing sides with a feeler gauge. Factory specs are .002-.006.


View attachment 235539

Those look like regular plugs with one just cut down. The plugs I removed from my engine come to a point on the backside. I might just get some new plugs from the hardware store and turn one down in the lathe.

I also picked up a new oil pump kit, I'm going to clean my front cover for the last time tonight and try and assemble it.
 

obrut

Member
I assembled the front cover tonight. I measured the housing with the gears installed using a straight edge and measured .003 the side clearance was .004 The gasket that came with the oil pump kit measured .0055 So that should give me the .002 clearance I need. I then took everything apart and re-cleaned everything through the parts washer first and then sprayed with brake parts cleaner. I assembled the pump assembly with GM E.O.S. tightened down everything and the pump seems to turn without any problems. I did install the KB plate and gasket matched everything. I installed the yellow spring that came with the kit.

Did I miss anything here?
 

ek02

Well-Known Member
Did you pack the pump with vaseline? It may not pick up the oil when you prime the system. I pack the pump, and then when the cover is installed, I spin the pump with the filter off until a wad of vaseline followed by oil comes out. Then put the filter on and continue to prime until oil comes out of all the rockers. It may pick up the oil with just EOS, but the vaseline works every time.
 

obrut

Member
Did you pack the pump with vaseline? It may not pick up the oil when you prime the system. I pack the pump, and then when the cover is installed, I spin the pump with the filter off until a wad of vaseline followed by oil comes out. Then put the filter on and continue to prime until oil comes out of all the rockers. It may pick up the oil with just EOS, but the vaseline works every time.

Not yet, I wanted to make sure I didn't miss anything. I noticed that the pump turns free but I can't really feel any up and down in the pump shaft, which is probably a good thing. Is there a way to measure the end play of the gear after assembly with a dial indicator or something?

I can pull the adapter off and pack it, do I just pack the area where the gears are?

I'm also going to order the plugs from TA performance today, I couldn't find anything at three hardware stores that was close, for $7 I'll just order them.

Thanks for the help
 

ek02

Well-Known Member
If you can get a dial indicator clamped to the front cover and get the button on the oil pump shaft, you can measure it there. It may be hard to feel the play with oil on the gears. Be careful grabbing the shaft. The slots can be sharp and cut your finger. If you can turn the shaft with no binding, and the end play is .0015-.002, it's good. Pack the vaseline in and around the gears level with the face of the cavity. It creates enough suction to pull the oil up out of the pan. There are some other threads on here with methods some have used to prime the pump without using vaseline that seems to work. The vaseline trick is just fast and easy.
 

obrut

Member
20151227_205153.jpg
Time got the better of me on this one. I finally have time to get this engine back together. Lucky I bagged and tagged everything, wrapped the engine and heads up good and keep everything in order. So I disassembled one of the heads to clean it. I noticed that I only had seals on the intake valves. It looks like the guides are machined for seals on both intake and exhaust and the valves do not have the step in them. Should I put seals on both? Can I reuse the seals I pulled off before putting the heads in the parts washer? The engine only had a few hundred miles on it. Do the seals just press down dry or do I need to lube them first?
 

ek02

Well-Known Member
You need seals on both the intake and exhaust. Stock heads did not use seals on the exhaust valves, but the guides were higher and the valve stems were made to work with no seals. You have aftermarket valves. Most seals come with a clear plastic sleeve to put over the valve stem so you don't cut the seals. I have used a wrap of tape on the stem if I don't have a sleeve, and oil on the seal.
 
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