Brisk spark plug

GN87Mike

Member
Or the DR10s maybe.... I had the DR12s recommended for my motor with GN1 heads but I am running gas with 9.0, 28 psi. I currently use Autolite 3922 and 3924....much cheaper.
 

Boost231

What's An Intercooler
Staff member
I would start with a 10 then probably move to the 12

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

dynoman

Well-Known Member
I forgot to mention that the heads ( chambers & ports ) & pistons are fully High temp coated .
 

Ttype6

Well-Known Member
will these plugs work with my combo ?Brisk DR12S
Yes.
Until I discovered these DR10S,DR12S,and DR14S plugs,The only plug available that met all of the criteria (Gasket plug,Relatively cold,Non projected tip,Resistor,and Cut back ground strap) was the NGK BCR8ES. It's quite cold,but I often thought it would be nice if a colder version was available to try,but it was the only version they offered.
When we talk about a cold plug,we are talking about its ability to remove heat from the electrode. If we allow the electrode to become too hot,the air fuel mixture will ignite prematurely (pre ignition) and that is not good. Now the only time you need a plug that can keep the electrode cold is at WOT. You don't have a heat problem while cruising around on the street. If you cruise around the streets with a cold plug,you will notice that the idle will become erratic with some stumbling at a stop light. The reason for this is because the electrode becomes so cold that it doesn't burn enough deposits off of itself so the ignition starts to misfire. To clean the deposits you simply run to the next stoplight at WOT which creates enough heat to clean the electrode and you will notice a very smooth idle when you get to the next light. I've experienced this with the BCR8ES plugs,so I know that it is relatively cold.
Copper is a good conductor of electricity,but the silver used in the brisk's electrode is better,meaning less resistance. Because it has less resistance,it will produce a colder spark because the secondary voltage put out by the coil will be less because of the lower resistance.
Copper is a good conductor of heat,but silver is better so it has a greater ability to take heat away from the electrode.

The brisk DR12S is their equivalent to the NGK BCR8ES
When it comes to Brisk,14 is hot,12 is colder,and 10 is the coldest.
 
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SS/GN

Well-Known Member
Why are you using these plugs?? Tried them in our Super stocker and found nothing and very $$$
 

dynoman

Well-Known Member
Why are you using these plugs?? Tried them in our Super stocker and found nothing and very $$$
Not many choices for E85 , aluminum head , high compression , high boost motors , plus they have different heat ranges of the same plug .
 

Ttype6

Well-Known Member
Why are you using these plugs?? Tried them in our Super stocker and found nothing and very $$$
Because of our computers,we need a resistor plug because of electromagnetic interference. Because of our aluminum heads,we need a plug with more reach than the stock plug. Because of our aluminum heads,we need a gasketed plug. We can use a tapered seat plug,but it's not the ideal.When we make more power,we want a non-projected tip and a cut back ground strap. Lastly we need a colder plug as the power goes up.
The only plug with all of these features is the NGK BCR8ES. It's fairly cold but it would be nice to have a colder option. Brisk meats all of the aforementioned criteria plus they have an option that is colder than the NGK BCR8ES.

So,why would we pay the extra money for a brisk that offers no power gain?
Colder heat range option to protect against pre-ignition.
 

jmendlik

Active Member
What about the Brisk DR08S . I got this Plug from Bison to use in my GN1 Stage 1 Stroker motor 9:1 Comp E85. I have not pu them in yet as I just put fresh NGK 8CR8ES so will try soon...
 

dynoman

Well-Known Member
Brisk DR12S is the same heat range as the NGK BCR8ES . A Brisk DR08S is 2 steps colder .
Look at the heat range chart in post #8
 

SS/GN

Well-Known Member
Because of our computers,we need a resistor plug because of electromagnetic interference. Because of our aluminum heads,we need a plug with more reach than the stock plug. Because of our aluminum heads,we need a gasketed plug. We can use a tapered seat plug,but it's not the ideal.When we make more power,we want a non-projected tip and a cut back ground strap. Lastly we need a colder plug as the power goes up.
The only plug with all of these features is the NGK BCR8ES. It's fairly cold but it would be nice to have a colder option. Brisk meats all of the aforementioned criteria plus they have an option that is colder than the NGK BCR8ES.

So,why would we pay the extra money for a brisk that offers no power gain?
Colder heat range option to protect against pre-ignition.

Thanks for the informative info, I did not know this for this application. :cool: Would Autolite have anything in the Racing plugs?? Just a thought.
 

GN87Mike

Member
Thanks for the informative info, I did not know this for this application. :cool: Would Autolite have anything in the Racing plugs?? Just a thought.
Yes Autolite does make racing plugs with 3/4" reach and a gasket that do fit in our aluminum heads but don't have all the desirable/needed features that the Brisk plugs have as stated very well by Ttype6. The closest in a resistor plug would be as an example the AR3923 but it has a projected tip and the AR3933 has a recessed tip but is non resistor. The R is for a race plug and 2nd number from the right tells if it is a resistor or non resistor plug (even number is resistor and odd number non resistor). The last number on the right is the heat range. When you get above a certain performance level you need to find a favorite plug that works well for the street and a favorite for the strip and change them back and forth. The plug for the track may be one or two ranges colder and non projected while the street plug may be projected and hotter.....Maybe a Brisk for the track and maybe an Autolite or other brand for the street. At least that's the way I do it.

Thanks,
Mike
 
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