Billet piston

jimski

In over my head
What are the thoughts on these, notice the bleed holes in it. It will not hold pressure.
66070EA1-27D4-4243-92A6-472261CCC3B5_zpsg5hhbrrk.jpg
 

mikestertwo

Well-Known Member
It's there to soften engagement when you put the transmission in gear. The hole gets blocked by the steel when it gets compressed.
 

Steve V

Steve V's Automotive 757 560 2782
I use the stock piston(steel) in foward, and a ring in direct. Forward is on 90% on the time. I don't see the advantage of a billet piston in forward.
 

Steve V

Steve V's Automotive 757 560 2782
That's a good question. I'm experiencing using the wave plate the stack slightly does not fit.
You can omit the wave plate if needed, it will cause a harsher apply-it's already harsh in the BR calibration. I talked to RC about this, he leaves it out.
 

mikestertwo

Well-Known Member
You can use a wave plate or a flat steel. It's a matter of preference. Some customers don't mind the harshness of the gear engagement some do.
 

INEEDAGN

Seen Your Member
The aluminum "feed/bleed" piston uses a thinner pressure plate than the steel piston variety. If you don't have one, you can omit the wave plate and swap steel thicknesses around as long as you get your stack up close to where it should be. The billet piston exists because the factory aluminum piston is failure prone. If you do use a wave plate you can actually tell a difference in the way it air checks depending upon how you orient the wave plate (whether you put the "down" areas of the wave directly against the holes or not).

The forward drums that came from the factory with the feed/bleed setup don't have the bleeder ball capsule in the drum itself. I've never put a steel piston in a feed/bleed drum but I've heard it won't hurt anything even though it has no way to purge air from the circuit.
 
Top