Are these rolled fillets?

Discussion in 'Before Black (non-SFI) Tech' started by DollaDanny, Aug 12, 2017.

  1. DollaDanny

    DollaDanny
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    Sorry for all the 101/newbie questions but I greatly appreciate the help!

    Are these rolled fillets?
     

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  2. Nick Micale

    Nick Micale
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    Yes, thay are rolled fillets.

    A turbo crank will have them on both rod and main journals.
     
  3. DollaDanny

    DollaDanny
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    Thanks, Nick. The casting number on the crank and my research online makes me think it is a N/A crank and it looks cast. As long as it has the rolled fillets, should it be ok to use for a turbo?
     
  4. No disintegrations

    No disintegrations
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    From the pic it seems to need polishing or a regrind.
     
  5. Nick Micale

    Nick Micale
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    GM had only one part number for the 231 crank, no different number for the turbo Buick crank, but they did have a specific part number for the Turbo Trans Am crank as it was different with cross-drilled oil feed holes.

    There were also different casting numbers on V-6 cranks, so that is not an indicator of turbo or non-turbo cranks.

    My opinion is that a 30+ year old cast crank, turbo or non-turbo, is not a good basis for building an engine, especially if performance up-grades are to be added to the build.
     

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